Effects of Blue Light on Alertness in the News

Neurologist George Brainard 750x1050 ewc_JeffAlumni122011147

Neurologist George C. Brainard, PhD

Exposure to blue – short wavelength – light during the day improves alertness and performance, according to a recent study in the journal Sleep.

The study was led by sleep researchers at Harvard University-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital joined by Jefferson professor of neurology George C. Brainard, PhD. Dr. Brainard is director of Jefferson’s Light Research Program, and he developed the specialized light equipment used in the study.

The results of the study were featured in a number of news articles including one in the Business Standard:

“These results contribute to our understanding of how light impacts the brain and open up a new range of possibilities for using light to improve human alertness, productivity and safety,” said Harvard’s Steven Lockley, senior investigator of the study.

“While helping to improve alertness in night workers has obvious safety benefits, day shift workers may also benefit from better quality lighting that would not only help them see better but also make them more alert.”

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One Response to Effects of Blue Light on Alertness in the News

  1. Saby111 February 17, 2014 at 8:10 am #

    What they don’t tell you is that in order to maintain healthy brain activity long term we need REM sleep, which Low Blue light impedes and contributes to causing insomnia and disrupted sleep patterns. Its one reason why we have so many people taking sleep aides (which have been proven) to only help you get to sleep 10-15 minutes faster and cause sleep walking and less REM sleep.

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